New Breakthrough Study Suggests Medical Marijuana Patients Are Opting For Vaporizers More Than Ever Before

More and more frequently, patients who use medical marijuana are choosing vaporization as their preferred way of ingesting cannabis, as found by a new survey published in the Drug & Alcohol Dependence & The Harm Reduction medical journal.

In one of their studies, researchers from the School of Public Heath at the University of Waterloo asked 364 medical marijuana patients that were registered in Canadian medical marijuana programs what their consumption habits consisted of.

The authors of the report found that the most popular method of delivery of medical cannabis in the patients surveyed was vaporization. The subjects taking part in the study reported that vaporization was preferred because of the reduction of negative health issues that are associated with smoking.

In a separate study, researchers at the University of Michigan asked 1,485 patients in their state’s registered medical cannabis program the same question. From the people that responded, 39% reported that they had used vaporization to consume cannabis within the last month.

However, many of these patients also reported that they smoked marijuana also as a way of delivering the drug. Patients who were younger, usually under 44 years of age, and people who had a longer history of using medical marijuana were more likely to be using a vaporizer.

The technology in a vaporizer heats the marijuana to the temperature which forms cannabinoid vapors but keeps it below combustion temperature. Clinical trials dedicated to testing the tech have found that vaporization is both safe and effective for delivering cannabidiol (CBD) and the many cbd oil benefits in a way that doesn’t result in the patient being exposed to gasses from combustion.

Approximately 400,000 people in the United States are currently dealing with multiple sclerosis, the autoimmune disorder causing the body’s immune system to attack myelin found in nerves. Common symptoms include balance and gait disorders, fatigue, pain, muscle spasticity, and cognitive dysfunction.

Colorado has the largest percentage of people with MS in all of the U.S. Some estimates claim that 1 in 550 people in the state suffers from MS, as opposed to the national rate of 1 in 750. The reason is unknown, but some speculate that it could be the result of several factors, including deficiency of Vitamin D or environmental factors.

The therapies currently available do not relieve the symptoms of MS sufficiently. Because of this, many people who have this condition try an alternative therapy, including cannabis. After several research studies, the AAN (American Association of Neurology) found that there may be evidence that cannabis can help treat muscle spasticity and pain.

The full text of the study can be found in the journal “Drug & Alcohol Dependence.”